Resources

Lesson Plans
We provide lesson plans ranging in topic from the American Revolutionary War to the 1940 U.S. Federal Census to help you integrate historical records into lesson plans, teach students how to manage research projects, approach critical thinking and gain the communication skills needed in life. These Lesson Plans have been written by teachers according to the History Standards administered by the National Center for History in the Schools at the University of California, Los Angeles under the guidance of the National Council for History Standards. Please click a lesson plan below to download the PDF: Have a Lesson Plan you'd like to see? Let us know!

Research Guides

Check out the Free Research Guides on Ancestry.

Documents

  • Interviewing a family member? — Here are a list of questions that will assist in the process.

  • In 2014, on behalf of Ancestry.com, the H.W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill undertook an exploratory study of whether involvement in family history research is correlated with being active in one’s local community. Through a matched samples design, we explored whether persons engaged in family history research perform more volunteer work, are more active in voting and/or public affairs, belong to more civic or veterans organizations, or contribute more to charitable causes than those not engaged in family history research. In this preliminary study, being involved in family history research is positively correlated with all of these behaviors.
    Download Family History Research and Community Involvement by Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina


Charts and forms

Printable PDFs of our most popular charts/forms - in particular the Ancestral Chart and Family Group sheet should be very valuable to keeping track of your family members. There are also blank census charts for each year that you are able to print out and study.

K12 Newsletters

September 2017